Articles

From technical modding to gorgeous aesthetics, HHL contributors are adding to our library of hand-held gaming mods.

What are “Newton Rings”?

Posted by Dustin Hamilton on

I don’t think the name is all that commonly used, but is the term that I hear most often when referring to this phenomenon… and no, this isnt an update to fig newton bars. That’s something else.

Newton rings are most notably seen when backlighting a Game Boy DMG or a Game Boy Pocket, and when I see them they look like liquid dropped between the LCD glass and the rear polarizer, but that’s not the case at all, as you’ll see here.

Unfortunately I found them difficult to capture on film and will try again with the next build I do.

Hand Held Legend, HHL, Newton Rings, Game Boy DMG, Game Boy Pocket

The downfall of this is that they don’t always occur… and even when seen, they may not always be present… which is what makes these odd. If you’ve ever seen what looks like a liquid drop under the LCD, you know what I’m talking about already.

It’s a simple, albeit strange, fix… and in giving credit where it’s due, thanks to Shawn Maxwell (http://youtube.com/sjm4306) for this tip today.

You’re going to need two things: a makeup brush and some baby powder or talc. Yes, you read that correctly. ;)

Hand Held Legend, HHL, Newton Rings, Talk, Baby Powder, makeup brush, Game Boy DMG, Game Boy Pocket

What is causing the touching is that there isn't any physical barrier between the rear polarizer and the LCD glass on the back-side… so what’s needed is to keep those separated, and it so happens that the lightest touch of baby powder does just that. So long as you dust it on light enough, you wont be able to even notice it’s there.

Lets get started...

1) Prep

Put a bit of baby powder on a sheet of paper, or a paper towel… something just to hold it so that it doesnt make a mess anywhere. Lightly - very lightly - dip your makeup brush into the baby powder, then tap off the excess. You should have a brush that looks similar to how much this has on it:

Hand Held Legend, HHL, Newton Rings, Makeup brush, baby powder, Game Boy DMG, Game Boy Pocket

2) Apply

Take the makeup brush and lightly dust the top of the rear polarizer with it… if you see any white flecks or streaks, a bit too much was used and needs to be done again. It’s easy - just tap some more of the make up off and give it another try.

Hand Held Legend, HHL, Newton Rings, Game Boy DMG, Game Boy Pocket, baby powder, makeup brush

You might end up with some pieces of the hairs from the makeup brush itself, but not to worry, you can get rid of those by gently blowing on the polarizer or another light brushing.

3) Reassemble

I suggest putting the polarizer back in front of the backlight on your console and then turning it on in order to see if any dust particles or brush particles can be seen easily with the naked eye. If so, no big deal - just slide the polarizer back out and give it another light dusting but without adding any more baby powder to the brush.

4) Wrap it up

Once you reassemble the console and don’t see any flecks, you should also no longer see any areas where there looks to be the Newton Rings (“liquid look”) under the LCD.

What do you think? Have you seen these lines before in your or someone else’s build? Now you know what you can do about it!

Read more

What are “Newton Rings”?

Posted by Dustin Hamilton on

I don’t think the name is all that commonly used, but is the term that I hear most often when referring to this phenomenon… and no, this isnt an update to fig newton bars. That’s something else.

Newton rings are most notably seen when backlighting a Game Boy DMG or a Game Boy Pocket, and when I see them they look like liquid dropped between the LCD glass and the rear polarizer, but that’s not the case at all, as you’ll see here.

Unfortunately I found them difficult to capture on film and will try again with the next build I do.

Hand Held Legend, HHL, Newton Rings, Game Boy DMG, Game Boy Pocket

The downfall of this is that they don’t always occur… and even when seen, they may not always be present… which is what makes these odd. If you’ve ever seen what looks like a liquid drop under the LCD, you know what I’m talking about already.

It’s a simple, albeit strange, fix… and in giving credit where it’s due, thanks to Shawn Maxwell (http://youtube.com/sjm4306) for this tip today.

You’re going to need two things: a makeup brush and some baby powder or talc. Yes, you read that correctly. ;)

Hand Held Legend, HHL, Newton Rings, Talk, Baby Powder, makeup brush, Game Boy DMG, Game Boy Pocket

What is causing the touching is that there isn't any physical barrier between the rear polarizer and the LCD glass on the back-side… so what’s needed is to keep those separated, and it so happens that the lightest touch of baby powder does just that. So long as you dust it on light enough, you wont be able to even notice it’s there.

Lets get started...

1) Prep

Put a bit of baby powder on a sheet of paper, or a paper towel… something just to hold it so that it doesnt make a mess anywhere. Lightly - very lightly - dip your makeup brush into the baby powder, then tap off the excess. You should have a brush that looks similar to how much this has on it:

Hand Held Legend, HHL, Newton Rings, Makeup brush, baby powder, Game Boy DMG, Game Boy Pocket

2) Apply

Take the makeup brush and lightly dust the top of the rear polarizer with it… if you see any white flecks or streaks, a bit too much was used and needs to be done again. It’s easy - just tap some more of the make up off and give it another try.

Hand Held Legend, HHL, Newton Rings, Game Boy DMG, Game Boy Pocket, baby powder, makeup brush

You might end up with some pieces of the hairs from the makeup brush itself, but not to worry, you can get rid of those by gently blowing on the polarizer or another light brushing.

3) Reassemble

I suggest putting the polarizer back in front of the backlight on your console and then turning it on in order to see if any dust particles or brush particles can be seen easily with the naked eye. If so, no big deal - just slide the polarizer back out and give it another light dusting but without adding any more baby powder to the brush.

4) Wrap it up

Once you reassemble the console and don’t see any flecks, you should also no longer see any areas where there looks to be the Newton Rings (“liquid look”) under the LCD.

What do you think? Have you seen these lines before in your or someone else’s build? Now you know what you can do about it!

Read more


A tale of two Pockets: 5v step-up regulator install by linklooklisten (Matt G)

Posted by Dustin Hamilton on

Matt G, better known as linklooklisten, is a modder based in New York City, New York and a prolific poster on Instagram and Twitter. We became aware of him via his Instagram feed by not only the designs and photography, but also the helpfulness of helping people learning and do things is a 'breath of fresh air' as it were. He's keenly interested in helping build up this hobby.

He decided to take our recent post about adding a 5v step-up regulator to the Game Boy Pocket when backlit and kindly made a pictorial guide out of it and a video to showcase the different.

Simply enough, thank you Matt!

===== ====== =====

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend

Ever since I received this Extreme Green Gameboy Pocket in the mail back in December of 2016, I wanted it to be more…extreme… more… green. And what better way to do that than by adding a green backlight to it. I had already modded a bunch of original Gameboy systems at this point and became  familiar with AGS-101 screen mods for GBAs. This Extreme Green Pocket would be my first pocket to modify. I installed the backlight, slept that night, and installed the bivert module the next day using the V2 bivert which meant I had to run wires from the front of the motherboard to the speaker area where the bivert rested as well as a resistor to the backlight. It wasn’t easy since it was my first go at this, but I prevailed.

Now in 2019, much has changed in terms of boards and backlights. Biverts have shrunk, and resistors are built in to backlight ribbons. Since the times have changed, I figured to at least swap the older bivert for the new one and also add a 5v step-up regulator so that my first modded pocket can have a better 5v source to keep the backlight nice and bright. I’ve yet to install a V3 backlight because the V2 with a resistor gets the same results. Many flash carts like the El Cheapo and Everdrive can also cause the Pockets backlit screen to flicker when a rom is being written to it’s memory, contrast may be adjusted to undesired levels automatically or the screen could turn blank entirely. Installing the Pololu 5v Step-Up module fixes these issues as well.

Let’s begin!

What’s required:

  • Y1 and Phillips screwdriver
  • Soldering iron and supplies (a thin tip on the soldering iron is recommended)
  • Wire
  • A Pololu U1V10F5 (this is the 5v regulator, very small which is perfect for a Pocket)
  • Patience and time (don’t rush!)
  • Quick tip: always solder ground (GND) lines first!

First, open up the system. (I installed the drop-in bivert chip a few weeks ago.)

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend

Focus on the lower right area on the board. We’re going to prep the 2 solder joints labeled 3 and 1. If you follow this to the front of the board, 3 connects to GND and 1 to VCC on the pockets DC regulator. Add some solder to both of these. I chose this spot instead of the speaker because the Pololu U1V10F5 is so small, it fits in this area with zero interference to wires, capacitors or the shell when attempting to close. Personally, I prefer to see little to no wires. Clean builds look better than spaghetti, but to each their own! If you dig wires, put more in there!

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend

Next, prep the Pololu 5v regulator with some solder too.

Before: Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend - Pololu  After: Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend - Pololu

Next, I measured how short of a wire I’d need to cut to make VIN on this little board reach #1(VCC) on the back of the system board (VCC on the regulator), I did the same for GND on both the small 5v board to #3 (GND on the system regulator),

Connect GND on the 5v board to #3/GND on the system, then VIN on the small 5v board to #1/VCC on the system. Always solder ground first!

We’re good with this small board for now. Let’s shift gears to the backlight. Since this system was already modded, I had to remove the 2 wires on the backlight ribbon. I measured how long the new wires would need to be in order to reach GND and VOUT on the Pololu 5v board. Again, this is my preference. If you do not want exact measurements, cut longer wires. After measuring, I connected a blue wire to the - solder pad, and a red wire to the previously removed resistor, and connected the resistor to the + solder pad, with both wires facing to the left.

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend

Slide the backlight back in to the display and carefully wrap the wires around to the front of the system board. Solder the other end of the blue wire to GND on the Pololu board and make sure the wire currently in GND stays in there.Then solder the red wire to VOUT. In the end, we have 2 really short wires connecting the Pololu 5v board to the Pocket system board, and the 2 backlight wires going to the Pololu board. I snuck in a piece of Kapton tape under the Pololu board as a safety precaution.

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend - Pololu

The red and blue backlight wires should fit perfectly between the system board and shell. This is another reason why I prefer wires at the exact length. If they were any longer, they would have to get tucked in a bit further and be visible from the front of the system. I guess this is more of a non-issue if you have a solid colored Pocket, but I’ve found myself still cutting wires to their exact length even on non-transparent systems for practice. I want them to look good inside of the system whether you can see it or not.

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend - Pololu

Upon closing the system, you’ll notice the back of the shell closes with no problems. Nothing gets stuck or is too snug. In this particular build, you can see the Pololu step-up board. If you want to, you can tape down the step-up board using a piece of double-sided tape, but the 2 wires being so short also means the board isn’t moving anywhere.

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend - Pololu

Put in 2 AAA batteries to test it all out. The result should be a brightly lit screen.

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend

I keep trying to perfect this particular Gameboy Pocket, which is why it’s been a work in progress over the past few years. I cannot stress this next part enough: the drop-in bivert option is totally worth it and makes a massive difference in the quality. The contrast pops and overall image quality looks much cleaner.

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend

As an alternative, the Pololu board could be installed on the back of the speaker, just trace the wire length along the bottom of the system board. That should keep things looking clean as well. Also, using a V3 backlight means no need for a resistor.

As I mentioned earlier,the 5v step-up module fixes flash cart loading issues. This video shows what it's like trying to load an Everdrive on a modded Pocket both with and without the Pololu 5v board installed.

 

 

About linklooklisten

Matt G (linklooklisten) is a regularly shared modder on our social pages (Facebook, Instagram) and we're glad to have him join us in sharing some articles with you about modding. He has always loved portable gaming and got his first limited edition gold colored Game Boy Pocket as a child and started collecting Game Boy games. He began modding Playstation Portables (PSPs) back in 2005, later installing different colored shells, custom firmware, creating what was known as Pandora batteries and making recovery memory sticks for friends and forum goers. Fast forward to 2016 when he would backlight his first DMG Game Boy and the rest is history.

Profile: linklooklisten

Read more

Matt G, better known as linklooklisten, is a modder based in New York City, New York and a prolific poster on Instagram and Twitter. We became aware of him via his Instagram feed by not only the designs and photography, but also the helpfulness of helping people learning and do things is a 'breath of fresh air' as it were. He's keenly interested in helping build up this hobby.

He decided to take our recent post about adding a 5v step-up regulator to the Game Boy Pocket when backlit and kindly made a pictorial guide out of it and a video to showcase the different.

Simply enough, thank you Matt!

===== ====== =====

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend

Ever since I received this Extreme Green Gameboy Pocket in the mail back in December of 2016, I wanted it to be more…extreme… more… green. And what better way to do that than by adding a green backlight to it. I had already modded a bunch of original Gameboy systems at this point and became  familiar with AGS-101 screen mods for GBAs. This Extreme Green Pocket would be my first pocket to modify. I installed the backlight, slept that night, and installed the bivert module the next day using the V2 bivert which meant I had to run wires from the front of the motherboard to the speaker area where the bivert rested as well as a resistor to the backlight. It wasn’t easy since it was my first go at this, but I prevailed.

Now in 2019, much has changed in terms of boards and backlights. Biverts have shrunk, and resistors are built in to backlight ribbons. Since the times have changed, I figured to at least swap the older bivert for the new one and also add a 5v step-up regulator so that my first modded pocket can have a better 5v source to keep the backlight nice and bright. I’ve yet to install a V3 backlight because the V2 with a resistor gets the same results. Many flash carts like the El Cheapo and Everdrive can also cause the Pockets backlit screen to flicker when a rom is being written to it’s memory, contrast may be adjusted to undesired levels automatically or the screen could turn blank entirely. Installing the Pololu 5v Step-Up module fixes these issues as well.

Let’s begin!

What’s required:

  • Y1 and Phillips screwdriver
  • Soldering iron and supplies (a thin tip on the soldering iron is recommended)
  • Wire
  • A Pololu U1V10F5 (this is the 5v regulator, very small which is perfect for a Pocket)
  • Patience and time (don’t rush!)
  • Quick tip: always solder ground (GND) lines first!

First, open up the system. (I installed the drop-in bivert chip a few weeks ago.)

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend

Focus on the lower right area on the board. We’re going to prep the 2 solder joints labeled 3 and 1. If you follow this to the front of the board, 3 connects to GND and 1 to VCC on the pockets DC regulator. Add some solder to both of these. I chose this spot instead of the speaker because the Pololu U1V10F5 is so small, it fits in this area with zero interference to wires, capacitors or the shell when attempting to close. Personally, I prefer to see little to no wires. Clean builds look better than spaghetti, but to each their own! If you dig wires, put more in there!

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend

Next, prep the Pololu 5v regulator with some solder too.

Before: Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend - Pololu  After: Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend - Pololu

Next, I measured how short of a wire I’d need to cut to make VIN on this little board reach #1(VCC) on the back of the system board (VCC on the regulator), I did the same for GND on both the small 5v board to #3 (GND on the system regulator),

Connect GND on the 5v board to #3/GND on the system, then VIN on the small 5v board to #1/VCC on the system. Always solder ground first!

We’re good with this small board for now. Let’s shift gears to the backlight. Since this system was already modded, I had to remove the 2 wires on the backlight ribbon. I measured how long the new wires would need to be in order to reach GND and VOUT on the Pololu 5v board. Again, this is my preference. If you do not want exact measurements, cut longer wires. After measuring, I connected a blue wire to the - solder pad, and a red wire to the previously removed resistor, and connected the resistor to the + solder pad, with both wires facing to the left.

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend

Slide the backlight back in to the display and carefully wrap the wires around to the front of the system board. Solder the other end of the blue wire to GND on the Pololu board and make sure the wire currently in GND stays in there.Then solder the red wire to VOUT. In the end, we have 2 really short wires connecting the Pololu 5v board to the Pocket system board, and the 2 backlight wires going to the Pololu board. I snuck in a piece of Kapton tape under the Pololu board as a safety precaution.

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend - Pololu

The red and blue backlight wires should fit perfectly between the system board and shell. This is another reason why I prefer wires at the exact length. If they were any longer, they would have to get tucked in a bit further and be visible from the front of the system. I guess this is more of a non-issue if you have a solid colored Pocket, but I’ve found myself still cutting wires to their exact length even on non-transparent systems for practice. I want them to look good inside of the system whether you can see it or not.

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend - Pololu

Upon closing the system, you’ll notice the back of the shell closes with no problems. Nothing gets stuck or is too snug. In this particular build, you can see the Pololu step-up board. If you want to, you can tape down the step-up board using a piece of double-sided tape, but the 2 wires being so short also means the board isn’t moving anywhere.

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend - Pololu

Put in 2 AAA batteries to test it all out. The result should be a brightly lit screen.

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend

I keep trying to perfect this particular Gameboy Pocket, which is why it’s been a work in progress over the past few years. I cannot stress this next part enough: the drop-in bivert option is totally worth it and makes a massive difference in the quality. The contrast pops and overall image quality looks much cleaner.

Game Boy Pocket v5 step-up voltage regulator - linklooklisten - Hand Held Legend

As an alternative, the Pololu board could be installed on the back of the speaker, just trace the wire length along the bottom of the system board. That should keep things looking clean as well. Also, using a V3 backlight means no need for a resistor.

As I mentioned earlier,the 5v step-up module fixes flash cart loading issues. This video shows what it's like trying to load an Everdrive on a modded Pocket both with and without the Pololu 5v board installed.

 

 

About linklooklisten

Matt G (linklooklisten) is a regularly shared modder on our social pages (Facebook, Instagram) and we're glad to have him join us in sharing some articles with you about modding. He has always loved portable gaming and got his first limited edition gold colored Game Boy Pocket as a child and started collecting Game Boy games. He began modding Playstation Portables (PSPs) back in 2005, later installing different colored shells, custom firmware, creating what was known as Pandora batteries and making recovery memory sticks for friends and forum goers. Fast forward to 2016 when he would backlight his first DMG Game Boy and the rest is history.

Profile: linklooklisten

Read more


Is the Game Boy a Computer?

Posted by Colin (This Does Not Compute) on

This is the first post in an occasional series by Colin from This Does Not Compute.

One of the things that has always interested me are devices that should be computers, but aren't really. We generally think of "computers" as multi-purpose systems, things that run an operating system and applications. But there are tons of devices out there that have processors and RAM but don't really run an operating system in the traditional sense. What is one very famous example of this that we are all familiar with? The Nintendo Game Boy series, specifically the original Game Boy, Game Boy Pocket, and Game Boy Color, sometimes referred to as the "DMG", "MGB" and "GBC" respectively.

I recently ran across the RealBoy emulator project (https://realboyemulator.wordpress.com). There are plenty of Game Boy emulators out there and this one isn't really any different... except for this excellent blog series that explains in depth how the original DMG works. It's meant as a primer in order to understand how the emulator's code works, but it's also an amazing look at the underlying hardware.

In short, the architecture of the Game Boy is pretty simple -- processor, RAM, and ROM. The first two reside in the console itself while the ROM (and some more RAM) is in the game cartridge. There's only a small amount of permanent code in the Game Boy hardware, basically just enough to get the device to perform an initial cartridge check. (The check is, in a way, a form of DRM; it makes sure that the game was licensed by Nintendo and not independently released).

The CPU is perhaps the most interesting part of the system. In the DMG, it's a Sharp LR35902. By all appearances it's a custom part, and in many ways it is, but designing an entire processor from the ground up just for a hand-held game system (or any game system at all really) isn't cost effective. So the Game Boy's CPU is actually based on the Zilog Z80, which was at that time -- and still is -- a common 8-bit processor. The Z80 itself was actually a binary-compatible version of the Intel 8080; not necessarily a clone, but capable of executing all the same instructions. There were some additions to the Z80 beyond that of the 8080, but the custom Sharp CPU wasn't just a rebadged Z80. It actually leveraged parts from both processor architectures, while omitting anything that wasn't relevant to a game console.

What to me at least, makes the Game Boy more of a device than a computer is that there was no traditional operating system layer, firmware, or anything standing in the way between the game and the hardware. After that initial check, the CPU simply ran any instructions presented to it by the game. Modern games are written using a high-level programming language like C, but older games were written in machine language telling the CPU exactly what to do and when. In some ways, the game itself was an operating system. (This is also partially why emulators aren't perfect -- you have to write high-level code that mimics how hardware works, whereas modern games, already written in a high-level language, can simply be ported to another platform)

You might be most surprised by the lineage of the Intel 8080. It was originally designed in 1974 (along with the Z80), and made its way into early PCs and even some arcade games like Space Invaders. But the 8080 also was the basis for subsequent Intel processors, like the 8086. The 8086 is where we get the common computer term "x86", as it spawned the 286, 386 and 486 CPUs. Those of course led to the Pentium series, and on to the modern processors we use in our computers today. It's crazy to think that in 1989 when it was released, the Game Boy actually shared some similarities with computers running Windows. It is in its own right, a computer... that also isn't.

This Does Not Compute is a YouTube channel (https://www.youtube.com/c/thisdoesnotcompute) about gaming, content creation and all things technology. Colin can be reached on Twitter @thisdoesnotcomp (https://www.twitter.com/thisdoesnotcomp) and Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/thisdoesnotcomp).

Read more

Is the Game Boy a Computer?

Posted by Colin (This Does Not Compute) on

This is the first post in an occasional series by Colin from This Does Not Compute.

One of the things that has always interested me are devices that should be computers, but aren't really. We generally think of "computers" as multi-purpose systems, things that run an operating system and applications. But there are tons of devices out there that have processors and RAM but don't really run an operating system in the traditional sense. What is one very famous example of this that we are all familiar with? The Nintendo Game Boy series, specifically the original Game Boy, Game Boy Pocket, and Game Boy Color, sometimes referred to as the "DMG", "MGB" and "GBC" respectively.

I recently ran across the RealBoy emulator project (https://realboyemulator.wordpress.com). There are plenty of Game Boy emulators out there and this one isn't really any different... except for this excellent blog series that explains in depth how the original DMG works. It's meant as a primer in order to understand how the emulator's code works, but it's also an amazing look at the underlying hardware.

In short, the architecture of the Game Boy is pretty simple -- processor, RAM, and ROM. The first two reside in the console itself while the ROM (and some more RAM) is in the game cartridge. There's only a small amount of permanent code in the Game Boy hardware, basically just enough to get the device to perform an initial cartridge check. (The check is, in a way, a form of DRM; it makes sure that the game was licensed by Nintendo and not independently released).

The CPU is perhaps the most interesting part of the system. In the DMG, it's a Sharp LR35902. By all appearances it's a custom part, and in many ways it is, but designing an entire processor from the ground up just for a hand-held game system (or any game system at all really) isn't cost effective. So the Game Boy's CPU is actually based on the Zilog Z80, which was at that time -- and still is -- a common 8-bit processor. The Z80 itself was actually a binary-compatible version of the Intel 8080; not necessarily a clone, but capable of executing all the same instructions. There were some additions to the Z80 beyond that of the 8080, but the custom Sharp CPU wasn't just a rebadged Z80. It actually leveraged parts from both processor architectures, while omitting anything that wasn't relevant to a game console.

What to me at least, makes the Game Boy more of a device than a computer is that there was no traditional operating system layer, firmware, or anything standing in the way between the game and the hardware. After that initial check, the CPU simply ran any instructions presented to it by the game. Modern games are written using a high-level programming language like C, but older games were written in machine language telling the CPU exactly what to do and when. In some ways, the game itself was an operating system. (This is also partially why emulators aren't perfect -- you have to write high-level code that mimics how hardware works, whereas modern games, already written in a high-level language, can simply be ported to another platform)

You might be most surprised by the lineage of the Intel 8080. It was originally designed in 1974 (along with the Z80), and made its way into early PCs and even some arcade games like Space Invaders. But the 8080 also was the basis for subsequent Intel processors, like the 8086. The 8086 is where we get the common computer term "x86", as it spawned the 286, 386 and 486 CPUs. Those of course led to the Pentium series, and on to the modern processors we use in our computers today. It's crazy to think that in 1989 when it was released, the Game Boy actually shared some similarities with computers running Windows. It is in its own right, a computer... that also isn't.

This Does Not Compute is a YouTube channel (https://www.youtube.com/c/thisdoesnotcompute) about gaming, content creation and all things technology. Colin can be reached on Twitter @thisdoesnotcomp (https://www.twitter.com/thisdoesnotcomp) and Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/thisdoesnotcomp).

Read more


Update - Backlights - Game Gear - Buttons and Screens

Posted by Kyle Capel on

Here are a few updates for those of you who have been asking about when we will be restocked with various items. We will be away July 18th - 25th. Store will be open but orders won't go out until the 27th.

  • New Backlights Version 2.0: Completion date is set on the 24th of July. I hope to have them and available on August 1st. Sorry for the wati! Pushed back again...
  • Screens: Complete date was the 29th of June and is not the 27th of July...  hope to have them and available on August 1st. Sorry for the wati!
  • Buttons have been revised so the ETA here is August...
  • Game Gear/Lynx Backlights are back in stock
  • OSAKA LOCA order placed - and shipment is being prepared. Hope to start selling July 27th.
  • Clear GBC shells are on backorder. We hope to have a lot of them in by... (you guessed it) August... I HOPE

What other products would you like to see in the shop? Comment below.

 

Read more

Update - Backlights - Game Gear - Buttons and Screens

Posted by Kyle Capel on

Here are a few updates for those of you who have been asking about when we will be restocked with various items. We will be away July 18th - 25th. Store will be open but orders won't go out until the 27th.

  • New Backlights Version 2.0: Completion date is set on the 24th of July. I hope to have them and available on August 1st. Sorry for the wati! Pushed back again...
  • Screens: Complete date was the 29th of June and is not the 27th of July...  hope to have them and available on August 1st. Sorry for the wati!
  • Buttons have been revised so the ETA here is August...
  • Game Gear/Lynx Backlights are back in stock
  • OSAKA LOCA order placed - and shipment is being prepared. Hope to start selling July 27th.
  • Clear GBC shells are on backorder. We hope to have a lot of them in by... (you guessed it) August... I HOPE

What other products would you like to see in the shop? Comment below.

 

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New Backlight Sneak Peak

Posted by Kyle Capel on

Here are some photos of the new thinner backlight with a flat fcp cable. They look amazing! Colors even better in person, the pictures do not do it justice. Clocking in at 1.23mm, this is our thinnest backlight ever. No cutting required!!

 

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New Backlight Sneak Peak

Posted by Kyle Capel on

Here are some photos of the new thinner backlight with a flat fcp cable. They look amazing! Colors even better in person, the pictures do not do it justice. Clocking in at 1.23mm, this is our thinnest backlight ever. No cutting required!!

 

Read more